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#1 Nov. 29, 2019 01:50:36

Calico
Registered: 2019-11-29
Posts: 2
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Hello, I'm new here and I would like some thoughts or similar experiences on this matter. I was diagnosed with Graves disease on August 2019 before that I was pregnant and I lost it due to chromosomal anomalies as they told me, I started on August an endocrinologist he didn't care about his patients so I went to another there she told me that if my levels of thyroid were good I would still have a miscarriage due to relapse of the thyroid. It's very sad for me because I don't have other child and for the doctor the only option is not removing the thyroid but a pregnancy without medicine (I'm taking carbimazole). Isn't that a big risk because as far I know you take the pills for life and don't stop them. I'm sorry for the big post. Thank you

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#2 Dec. 2, 2019 08:56:27

Kimberly
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Registered: 2008-10-14
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Hello and welcome - I'm so sorry for your loss. I'm guessing you are outside the USA, since we use a slightly different med here that is similar to carbimazole. I don't know if your doctor would be open to looking at guidelines from the USA, but the following guidelines from the American Thyroid Association might be of interest:

https://www.liebertpub.com/doi/pdf/10.1089/thy.2016.0457

For women with Graves' who desire a future pregnancy, there are advantages and disadvantages to ALL three treatment options (antithyroid meds, RAI, and surgery). You deserve a doctor who will discuss with you the risks and benefits of each and help you make the right decision for you.

We've had contact with many women who had successful pregnancies while dealing with Graves'. Whether you are taking antithyroid medications - or whether you are taking replacement hormone after RAI or surgery - it is critical to stay in close touch with your endocrinologist and gynocologist to make sure that your levels remain stable both for your safety *and* the baby's safety.

It *is* true that some women who are taking antithyroid medications during pregnancy find that they are able to keep stable levels on a reduced dose (or even no medications). Perhaps that is what your doctor was referring to?

Wishing you all the best!


Kimberly
GDATF Forum Facilitator

…through nature's inflexible grace, I'm learning to live…
– Dream Theater

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#3 yesterday 07:48:47

Calico
Registered: 2019-11-29
Posts: 2
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Hello, thank you for your understanding and the information you provided me.
I hope this endocrinologist will help me this time because I had started to lose hope but I want to believe this time will be different because the psychological part plays a big role in this situation. I would like if I have any further questions about Graves to give me more info about.
I'm from Greece and here as I talked with other persons with Graves they take carbimazole too. Thank you very much again.

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